In The Genus Garden

Early action for late performers

At busy times of the year it’s easy for us to forget to enjoy our gardens and spend time simply sitting and looking.  Having done just that, we're happy to say that the Genus garden is full to...

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Mothy memo

As we mentioned last week, some time in the borders tidying, dead heading, and tieing-in would be the order of the day.  Many of the dahlias had broken loose from their moorings and were running riot across their...

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Paying the price

We’ve paid the price again for having a few days away from the garden.  The lawns are now meadows, the weeds are appearing everywhere, and the perennials in the flower garden are still heading skywards.  In previous years...

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A new winter diet

This picture of leaves may seem unremarkable but it shows encouraging signs for those of us with who enjoy the glorious sight of a horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum) in flower or are lucky enough to have one or...

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Scaling the North Face

We’ve written before about the range of climbing plants that envelop the walls here at Genus HQ.  One such plant that we rarely see in other gardens is Schizophragma hydrangeoides (pictured) often known as the Japanese hydrangea vine. ...

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Bad hare day

We’ve been having suspicions for a few weeks.  Bark stripped off a pair of Magnolia stellata, a ground cover rose relieved of all its buds, little scuffs dug out around the fruit trees, and finally a clear...

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Euphorbia euphoria

We don’t have a huge collection of euphorbias here at Genus HQ but those we do have are cherished for their contribution to the beds and borders.  In spring visitors are greeted on the path alongside the garage to Euphorbia...

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Candles in the wind

In the Genus garden Malus, cherry, Sorbus, and Amelanchier are trees with exceptional blossom but a favourite on a totally different scale are the Aesculus trees - the horse chestnuts.  We have two, one probably about 50 years old and...

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Looking to the future

Gardeners are an optimistic bunch, never put off by failures, always trying again, and always looking to the future.  Small but barely noticeable signs at Genus HQ have made us aware that despite current restrictions mother nature is still forging...

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Galanthomania

As you read this, galanthomania is sweeping the country and keen snowdrop fans, or galanthophiles, are dropping to their knees to inspect the delicate petals of some of the rarer forms of snowdrop.  Well, they would be if coronavirus...

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Barking mad

Winter gardens concentrate the mind.  It’s the detail that counts.  Whether peering at the delicate formation of a snowdrops perianth, the frosted hairs on brittle seed heads, or the last few remaining translucent berries on the viburnum it’s a...

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The first real frost

We had our first real frost last week.  Not a surprise for late November but still a bit of a shock.  It turned out to be a day of bits and pieces.  The border that extends around from the...

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Black in the Garden - Pelargonium sidoides

The first thing you learn when using ‘black’ plants in the garden is that they’re rarely black; dark reds, purples, and sometimes dark blues are usually the norm.  Despite this, plants like Pelagonium sidoides do look virtually black in a...
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Black in the Garden - Blackfly

‘Hands up who likes blackfly’?  No, we don’t either.  They often appear suddenly in the garden and can cause several problems that need to be dealt with.

The bean aphid Aphis fabae is probably the one most commonly seen in gardens...
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Black in the Garden - Aeonium 'Zwartop'

We love Aeonium ‘Zwartcop’.  It’s a tender branching succulent that can grow up to 1.2 metres high and is a perfect specimen to have as an architectural centrepiece in pots or troughs.  Lucky inhabitants of Cornwall or The Isles of...
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Tulip time

We’re planting several hundred tulips this week.  Hooray!!

They arrived several weeks ago but we’ve been trying to make space in the beds to plant them.  We’ve gone for some old favourites; classics almost you might say.  ‘Rhapsody of Smiles’...

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Inspired by grasses

Ornamental grasses are extremely popular with gardeners in the UK.  With their height, movement, and colour they easily earn their place in any garden.  Last week could well have been called  ‘National Grass week’; social media was awash with stunning...

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Berries for the birds

It’s at this time of year that we realise the garden here at Genus HQ, whilst still retaining colour in the flower borders, is lacking colour elsewhere, particularly in the form of berries.  Berries are always attractive to look at...

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A peeling clematis

The north facing wall of the cottage at Genus HQ has a number of climbers but in autumn the ‘orange peel’ clematis ‘Bill MacKenzie’ shines a light into this shadier corner.

Orange peel clematis are a confusing bunch, seemingly coming...

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In the Genus Night Garden

With over 2,500 moth species in the UK we thought we’d try and see what lurked in the Genus HQ garden at night.  So we set up a light trap which comprises a funnelled collecting box with an ultraviolet bulb...

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Best behaviour

Plants are like children.  There are the naughty troublesome ones that require constant supervision, the loud shouty ones that are actually quite delicate, and the ones that just quietly get on with their lives requiring very little input and parenting....

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